Monthly Archives: October 2014

Diversity and dynamics of bacteriocins from human microbiome

New article in Environmental Microbiology finds that the prevalence of bacteriocin genes varies at different body sites, and fewer predicted bacteriocin-encoding genes are actually found in the gut than at any other site tested based on analysis of metagenomic data.  … Continue reading

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Adhesion as a weapon in microbial competition

New article from Kevin Foster’s group on how adhesion can be beneficial to individual cells in a biofilm and the implications on evolution within the biofilm and advantages during infection. Abstract: Microbes attach to surfaces and form dense communities known … Continue reading

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The community succession paper to end all community succession papers…

…not actually. But it tries; here’s the Gordon lab’s latest, from Cell: “To study how microbes establish themselves in a mammalian gut environment, we colonized germ-free mice with microbial communities from human, zebrafish, and termite guts, human skin and tongue, … Continue reading

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